Brisbane Airport BNE Issue 5 - page 19

BNE October/November 2014 |
19
Where to stay and play
Preachers
This is your local if you like the sound of Tuesday night bingo in
a former Metro Bus and a hand-pumped two metre tall ale from
the nearby Derwent Valley. Preachers also has its own brews
under the label World’s End. Match it with a hearty burger and
head for the beer garden. At 5 Knopwood Street, Salamanca.
Jack Greene
With 130 bottled beers from around the world and 16
constantly changing beer taps, Jack Greene is the ideal beer
and burger destination with European-inspired style. Cosy
in by the fire with a gourmet beef burger filled with wagyu
goodness from Robbins Island off the windswept coast of north
west Tasmania if you can find a seat amongst the locals. At 49
Salamanca Place, Salamanca. See
Smolt
With its Spanish and Italian influence, Smolt is equal parts
European and local in feel. Regional produce and handmade
offerings such as breads and pasta are the hallmark of this
restaurant. Settle in for a paella to share with a group of 20
or opt for tasting plates – Smolt is ideal for sharing while
enjoying good friends, food and drink. At 2 Salamanca Square,
Salamanca. See
Islington
A boutique luxe hotel with just 11 meticulously furnished rooms,
positioned with stunning views to Mount Wellington from its
delightful garden setting in South Hobart. It’s the epitome of
privacy and elegance with a stunning conservatory restaurant.
At 321 Davey St, Hobart. See
“W
hy not take the lake highway?” The suggestion is simple
and from a complete stranger who just happens to
be enjoying his coffee next to us in Hobart’s historic
Salamanca precinct, but we’re in a mood for adventure and decide to
follow his advice to take the highway that, apparently, few veer off to
explore. As we’re about to leave, he issues a final word … “if you book
ahead, you should stop by Belgrove Distillery in Kempton. It’s Australia’s
first and only rye distillery. I think you’ll like it.”
Now we’re intrigued and have a mission. Less than an hour later, we
arrive at Peter Bignell’s distillery. It’s one of those classic Tassie stories – Peter
produced rye as a trusty windbreak and for feeding his stock. Now he’s
producing spicy rye whiskey that’s found its way to some of the finest bars
on Australia’s east coast where it is being used to create new twists on many
classic cocktails.
“I had all this rye and didn’t know what to do with it,” Peter explains.
“After doing a little work at Nant Distillery just up the road, it suddenly
came to me. What else could I possibly do with this excess grain but
make whiskey!”
Further up the road, we follow more of our coffee mate’s advice and turn
left at Bothwell, population about 400 (and at least 50 buildings registered
or classified by the National Trust). But what our new-found friend didn’t
tell us was that we’d stumble across the perfect place for an impromptu
overnight stay – Australia’s oldest golf course, on a patch of land that
happens to be one of the earliest inland settlements in the country –
Ratho Farm.
The farm was first settled by a boatload of pioneering Scottish settlers in
1822 who brought the game of golf with them. It has since played host to
colourful characters ranging from Melbourne Cup winners, bushrangers,
100-year-old gardeners, golfing royalty and one of England’s best known
artists, and to fierce political debates. Today it’s also a working sheep farm
and, we can’t believe our luck, they have recently opened newly restored
convict-built accommodation and there’s a comfy bed available for us. In
fact, we discover that there is now accommodation for up to 40 guests in
the cottages and the homestead.
That evening we settle in with a hearty meal prepared by hosts Darren
and Sylvia. We have prime highland trout fishing just metres from the
veranda of our cottage and one of the world’s best preserved golfing
grounds out our side window.
Islington Hotel
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