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BNE November/December 2016 |

11

1

She colour codes books on her

shelves at home. “I saw them

color-coded at my sister-in-law’s

house and I thought it looked cute

so I started doing it. People always

point it out and I have a mini shame-

attack but I love it,” she told

The New

York Times

.

2

Her favourite book as a child

was, and still is,

Eloise

. “It’s

such a glamorous New York story for

little girls. She shows no real respect

for authority or the status quo. She

marches to her own beat. Several

years back, my sister commissioned

someone on Etsy to put me in an

Eloise picture and it’s my prize

possession.”

3

She openly admits she hates

making small talk, especially

in an elevator. “Talking to anyone I

don’t know on an elevator. (I guess

this counts as small talk, which

I’ve mentioned several times as

something I detest, but it’s even

more unbearable in an elevator

because you’re trapped!).”

4

Amy was quite athletic in her

high school days. She used

to play competitive volleyball and

still likes to play when she can; she

did boxing for a few years; she’s

also good at horseriding and she

has a scar on her leg from a surfing

accident when she was in high

school.

5

She meditates twice a day

for 20 minutes each time to

de-stress. In her new book she says,

“It helps clear my mind and get rid

of stress and it gives me energy.”

She also has weekly acupuncture

sessions and doesn’t drink coffee.

Amy Schumer performs at Brisbane

Entertainment Centre, Boondall, on 14 December.

Her book

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo

(published by HarperCollins) is out now.

thingsyou

didn’tknow

aboutAmy

Schumer

Her greatest attribute is how normal she is,” he

says, a view echoed by Hawn.

Film-maker Judd Apatow ‘discovered’

Schumer on radio. He heard her being

interviewed by legendary presenter Howard

Stern and thought she sounded like she had

more than a few jokes to tell. “She was so

engaging. She was talking about her dad having

MS and what her relationship is like with him.

It was very dark and sad, but also very sweet and

hilarious and she clearly adores him. I thought,

‘This is a very unique personality and I’d like

to see these stories in movies’,” he told

Variety

at the world premiere of

Trainwreck

, Schumer’s

first feature film as writer and star, directed by

Apatow. The film went on to make more than

$180 million at the box office.

By then, no one would have been surprised

that she was named one of

Time

magazine’s

100 Most Influential People in 2015 and

media interviewer Barbara Walters also

included Schumer on her list of 10 Most

Fascinating People.

Next year she will be seen in

Thank You For

Your Service,

a war-time drama produced by

Steven Spielberg and directed by

American

Sniper

’s Jason Hall, a part she had to audition for.

It may seem a meteoric rise to some but

Schumer feels she’s hustled long and hard to

get there. She started doing stand-up comedy

12 years ago and it was about three years later

she made it to the finals of television talent

show

Last Comic Standing

(after missing out at

the audition round in a previous season). She

finished fourth and more guest appearances

followed, then her own special on Comedy

Central, which led to her sketch comedy series

Inside Amy Schumer

. It’s been an instant hit

and bagged some top awards but while a fifth

season has been promised no start time has yet

been given.

Schumer says that although she had always

wanted to perform from the age of about 5, she

had no grand plan or knew how or if it might

work but she’s always liked making people laugh

– and clearly she’s good at it.

“I don’t do the observational stuff. I like

tackling the stuff nobody else talks about, like

the darkest, most serious thing about yourself. I

talk about life, about sex, and personal stories and

stuff everyone can relate to, and some can’t.”

And yes, she does believe that her on stage

persona is morphing closer to her own. “Now I

am more myself. I still say some things that are

just the funniest, worst things I can think of,

but it’s just more storytelling about the awful

moments of my life,” she says.

Photography by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images